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Media Release

Published: 08/08/2007

SouthWest Indian Film Theater Presents Native American and Indigenous Films Weekend

To be held at the Indian Pueblo Cultural Center
Albuquerque, NM – Award winning films by Native Americans and indigenous filmmakers is making its debut this weekend at the Indian Pueblo Cultural Center (IPCC) including a special screening by the “National Geographic-All Roads Film Project.”

            “We recognize that Native American Filmmaking is emerging on the international film scene and SWIFT is our way of bringing the best to New Mexico,” said Ron Solimon, President and CEO of IPCC. “We are also excited to have the All Roads Film Project join us for the first time this year,” he added.

            “New Voices, First Stories” by the All Roads Film Project will premiere on Sunday afternoon at 3 p.m. and features a series of short films by worldwide indigenous filmmakers.

            This is IPCC’s fourth SouthWest Indian Film Festival (SWIFT) and this year’s line-up offers films written, directed and produced by veteran and new filmmakers from the United States, Sweden and Mexico. Each year, filmmakers have been on hand at the festival to discuss their work.

            In past years, SWIFT has included in its diverse schedule, short and feature-length films in collaboration with the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of the American Indian (NMAI). This year, NMAI’s film selections include, “Waterbuster” a film about the impact of the Garrison Dam project built in the 1950’s to the Fort Berthold Indian Reservation. A second film program, “Animation Celebration” will run on Saturday. This compilation includes animation work by several young tribal filmmakers.

            The festival runs both August 11th and 12th from 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tickets are $3 per day. The full schedule is at www.indianpueblo.org. or call 505-843-7270 for more information. The Indian Pueblo Cultural Center is located at 2401 12th St. NW between I-40 and Menaul St. in Albuquerque, New Mexico.
 
 

SouthWest Indian Film Theater at the Indian Pueblo Cultural Center

Saturday, August 11

 Seasoned With Spirit: A Native Chef’s Journey with Loretta Barret Oden

Loretta Barrett Oden, renowned Native American Chef and of the Citizen Potawatomi Nation hosts the new PBS cooking, travel and Native American culture series Seasoned With Spirit. The shows comprise a culinary celebration of America’s bounty, combining Native American history and culture with delicious, healthy recipes inspired by indigenous foods. Co-produced by Native American Public Telecommunications (NAPT) and Connecticut Public Television (CPTV) in association with Resolution Pictures. Producers, Matt Cohen, Resolution Pictures – one episodes of a five part series. (27 min.)

9:30 am:           Gulf Coast Originals

A historical tour of this Gulf Coast region provides a lesson about Native influences on “Cajun” cooking. (27 min.)

10:00 am:         Pueblo Peoples: First Encounters

A story of the Pueblo peoples’ first encounters with Europeans entirely from the indigenous point of view.   Produced by George Burdeau (Blackfeet) for KNME TV (PBS) 1991.   (30 min.)

10:30 am:         Weaving Worlds

Highlights Navajo tales of how the west was “spun” by exploring the personal stories of Navajo weavers and their complex relationship with reservation traders. Producer/Director, Bennie Klain (Navajo). (56 min).

11:30 am:         A Defining Moment

In a dramatic move, members of the Ft. McDowell Yavapai Nation stood up against armed federal agents who raided the tribe’s casino in May 1992. It was a historic effort by tribal members to save their gaming operation from being shut down by federal authorities. The short documentary uses archival news footage, interview and other research material to capture a defining moment for Indian gaming in the state of Arizona. Indian leaders cal that day in May a time when a small tribe stood up for sovereignty. Tribal members simply call it a time when they stood up for what was rightfully theirs. Producer, NATV (2007, 15:45 min.) US

11:45 am:         Waterbuster
Old memories surface when the filmmaker revisits the upper Missouri River basin in North Dakota where his ancestors once lived. There he investigates the impact of the massive Garrison Dam project, constructed in the 1950s, which laid waste to a self-sufficient American Indian community, submerging 156,000 acres of fertile land, and ultimately displacing his family and the other people of the Fort Berthold Indian Reservation. (2006, 78 min.) US, Producer/Director/Editor/Writer: J. Carlos Peinado (Mandan/Hidatsa) Producer/Editor/Writer: Daphne Ross, Production Associate: Hillary Abe (Hidatsa/Mandan) Q & A with filmmaker following the viewing. 

1:15 pm:           Animation Celebration

This program of work presents delightful animations for young and old alike. Films include the following and are sponsored by the National Museum of the American Indian.

  • First Fire  - a claymation made by Cherokee highschool students. Directed by, Nathan Young (Pawnee/Delaware/Kiowa), (U.S., 2004, 11 min.)
  • Phantom of the Milpa and the Last Ear of Corn  - two animations made by Triqui children (Mexico, 2003, 4 min. total)
  • Day and Night and The Beginning They Toldtwo wonderful origin stories Directed by Joseph Erb (Cherokee), (U.S., 2005, 17 min)
  • Tainá-Kan, The Big Star- a traditional tale from the Karaja tribe. Directed by Adriana Figuierdo, (Brazil, 2005, 16 min.)
  • Raven Tales: The Sea Wolf a story of the first man summoning help from a sea monster. Director, Caleb Hystad, (Canada, 2006, 23 min)

2:30 pm:           Share the Wealth

A narrative short film that situates a homeless middle-aged Native American woman on a busy city street. Thanks to a new “homeless tax” incurred by the government, she must raise the dollar she now owes. Producer, Kristina Mann, Directed by Bennie Klain (Navajo). (8 min.)

2:45 pm:           Horse You See

Meet Ross, a horse from the Navajo Nation. Hear his story and share his thoughts as he explains the very essence of being a horse. Director, Melissa A. Henry (Navajo) (8 min) Q & A with the filmmaker following the viewing.

3:00 pm:           Calmmis calbmái/From An Eye to An Eye

In a traditional Sámi way, the filmmaker tells the story about his grandfather who has never left the north of Sweden, but has more knowledge and wisdom than most people do. The story is told with great enthusiasm and in the filmmaker's own personal and humoristic way, and on more that one occasion makes us laugh. Sweden. Director: Per-Josef Idivuoma (Sámi) (2007, 34 min)

3:45 pm:           Mile Post 398

When it comes to depicting life on the Navajo Nation, Mile Post 398 captures the essence of surviving day-today living as the shadows of alcoholism pound at the door of 30-year-old Cloyd who is struggling to salvage what is left of his life. The film is the first of its kind to be produced entirely on the Navajo Nation and utilize an entire Navajo case and crew. Producers/Directors/Writers, Shonie and Andee De La Rosa (Navajo). (110 min.)

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SouthWest Indian Film Theater at the Indian Pueblo Cultural Center

 Sunday, August 12

9:30 am:           When Your Hands Are Tied

Featuring Native Americans from across the country who tell their stories about struggling to maintain cultural identity in a time when Native language and tradition see to be drowning in waves of drugs, alcohol and indifference. Producer/Director/Editor, Mia Boccella Hartle (US, 56 min.)

10:30 am:        Waterbuster

Old memories surface when the filmmaker revisits the upper Missouri River basin in North Dakota where his ancestors once lived. There he investigates the impact of the massive Garrison Dam project, constructed in the 1950s, which laid waste to a self-sufficient American Indian community, submerging 156,000 acres of fertile land, and ultimately displacing his family and the other people of the Fort Berthold Indian Reservation. (2006, 78 min.) US. Producer/Director/Editor/Writer: J. Carlos Peinado (Mandan/Hidatsa) Producer/Editor/Writer: Daphne Ross, Production Associate: Hillary Abe (Hidatsa/Mandan) Q & A with filmmaker following the viewing.

12:15 pm:         Calmmis calbmái/From An Eye to An Eye

In a traditional Sámi way, the filmmaker tells the story about his grandfather who has never left the north of Sweden, but has more knowledge and wisdom than most people do. The story is told with great enthusiasm and in the filmmaker's own personal and humoristic way, and on more that one occasion makes us laugh. Sweden. Director: Per-Josef Idivuoma (Sámi) (2007, 34 min)

1:00 pm:           Share the Wealth

A narrative short film that situates a homeless middle-aged Native American woman on a busy city street. Thanks to a new “homeless tax” incurred by the government, she must raise the dollar she now owes. Producer, Kristina Mann, Directed by Bennie Klain (Navajo). (8 min.)

1:15 pm:           Silent Thunder                                                                                                     A heartwarming story of Stanford Addison: a Native American Elder, Spiritual Leader, Horse Tamer, and Quadriplegic. Through his unique method of gentling wild horses, Stanford delivers an inspiring and timely message of universal peace and cultural tolerance by sharing the experiences of his own life. Director/Producer/Editor, Angelique Midthunder ( 27 min.) Q & A with filmmaker following the screening.

2:00 pm:           Horse You See

Meet Ross, a horse from the Navajo Nation. Hear his story and share his thoughts as he explains the very essence of being a horse. Director, Melissa A. Henry (Navajo) (8 min) Q & A with the filmmaker following the viewing

2:15 pm            Yellow Dust

An experimental video mediates on how the uranium mined on the Navajo Reservation has been used.Director, Shonie De La Rosa (Navajo) (2003, 7 min.) US

Seasoned With Spirit: A Native Chef’s Journey with Loretta Barret Oden

Loretta Barrett Oden, renowned Native American Chef and of the Citizen Potawatomi Nation hosts the new PBS cooking, travel and Native American culture series Seasoned With Spirit. The shows comprise a culinary celebration of America’s bounty, combining Native American history and culture with delicious, healthy recipes inspired by indigenous foods. Co-produced by Native American Public Telecommunications (NAPT) and Connecticut Public Television (CPTV) in association with Resolution Pictures. Producers, Matt Cohen, Resolution Pictures – one episodes of a five part series. (27 min.)

2:30                  Food Upon the Water

Loretta helps Native American activist, Winona LaDuke to prepare favorite foods of the Ojibwe people of the Great Lakes region. (27 min.)

3:00 pm:           New Voices, First Stories

A series of short films by worldwide indigenous filmmakers. National Geographic-All Roads Film Project.

(75 min)

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